Behind the Brew: Chamomile

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Trivia

  • The word “chamomile” comes from the ancient Greek chamaimelon, meaning “ground apple.” While it’s actually related to the daisy, it smells a little like apples.
  • Chamomile has been used since ancient times. The Egyptians called it a cure for “ague” – a severe fever. It was sometimes even used to prevent nightmares!
  • The Anglo-Saxons considered chamomile one of their nine sacred herbs, used to prevent disease and treat wounds and poisonings.
  • In the Middle Ages, chamomile was strewn in banquet halls to freshen the air.

Tips and Tricks

  • Try placing cooled chamomile tea bags over your eyes to reduce puffiness and dark circles.
  • After shampooing, rinse your hair with cooled chamomile tea to bring out blonde highlights.
  • Gargling with lukewarm chamomile tea can help relieve a sore throat.

Try It

Straight

Blended

  • No. 67 Meadow, by Steven Smith Teamaker
  • Chamomile Citrus, by Mighty Leaf
  • Bravissimo by DAVIDsTEA

Bonus Trivia

  • Chamomile may be the world’s most popular herbal remedy: It has strong soothing properties and helps reduce or prevent inflammation. As a result, it’s used in many calming tisanes, as well as in skin lotions and creams meant to reduce redness and puffiness.
  • Really want to relax? Chamomile has often been associated with alcoholic drinks: the blossoms have been used to bitter beer, much like hops, and manzanilla sherry takes its name from the Spanish word for chamomile.

Bonus Tips and Tricks

  • Use a chamomile compress to help a minor cut or abrasion heal faster. Just steep a plain chamomile tea bag in a mixture of 1/4 teaspoon of non-iodized salt and 8oz of water. After about five minutes, remove the bag and place it gently on the wound; let it rest there for about 10 minutes before removing and patting dry. Repeat as needed.

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